The Episcopal Church in Hampton, New Hampshire Copyright 2017 Trinity Episcopal Church, Hampton, New Hampshire  03842     603-926-5688      trinity55ad@gmail.com
New to Us?
Information for Newcomers

What We Are About

At Trinity Church we are a community in faith that: respects each individual’s spiritual journey welcomes guests warmly as people whom God has sent for us to nurture on their spiritual journey will welcome you regardless of how much money you have, how old you are, how you are dressed, where you live, or any other distinctions that do not matter wants you to belong so that you can come to believe, rather than tell you what to believe before you can belong wants to help you fall in love with Jesus Christ so that you will want to join him in the work he is doing in the world encourages you to participate in worshipping God instead of just watching clergy and choir do it trusts you to use worship, prayer, and the scripture to form beliefs and act morally rather than try to tell you what you must believe or how you must behave values our relationships with each other more than having everybody agree on the “right” opinions proclaims the Good News that God loves you, and so do we

All Are Welcome

All people of faith - no matter age or denomination - are welcome to "receive communion." Episcopalians open our Table not because we take the Eucharist lightly, but because we take our baptism so seriously.   Visitors who prefer not to receive Communion are welcome to come forward during the Communion to receive a blessing from the Celebrant. Simply cross your arms over your chest as a sign you with to receive such a blessing.

Safe Church 

Trinity Church is a certified Safe Church. All our parish leaders, staff and regular volunteers are trained in best practices that insure the safety and security of everyone who comes to our services and events. Trinity Church provides a safe and healthy environment for all people. The Safe Church program is administered by the Diocese of New Hampshire and overseen at Trinity Church by a volunteer Safe Church Coordinator. You may view our diocese’s Safe Church policy here.

What does the name

"Episcopal Church" mean?

"The Episcopal Church" is one branch of the world-wide Anglican Communion numbering 70 million members in over 100 countries. It is often described as the "bridge church" because it includes both Catholic and Protestant traditions. It preserves the ancient Catholic faith and sacraments and the historic ministry with Bishops as its chief pastors. ("Episcopal" comes from the Greek word for "bishop.") It is at the same time Protestant, focusing on the basic authority of Holy Scripture and the proclamation of the Word of God.

What are the basic beliefs of

the Episcopal Church? 

Episcopalians promise to follow Jesus Christ as their Savior and Lord. Episcopalians believe in One God, the Father who creates us and all things, the Son who redeems us from sin and death, the Holy Spirit who renews us as the Children of God. Episcopalians believe the Holy Scriptures to be the Word of God and to contain all things necessary for salvation. We believe God inspired human authors and continues to speak to us through the Bible. Episcopalians affirm that salvation is the end of our separation from God and the beginning of a new relationship with God and with one another. The Apostles' and Nicene Creeds are basic statements of our beliefs in God.

What is the mission of an

Episcopalian?

The mission of an Episcopalian is not simply a matter of "saving souls." Neither is it simply a matter "feeding the hungry." Christian mission is seen as involving both the spiritual and they physical welfare of mankind, for Christ's love must extend to all of life. The mission of the Church is to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ.

I don't know when to sit,

stand or kneel.

At Trinity Church, we respect a variety of worship practices and customs. During the service some people may make the sign of the cross or bow at various points, while others do not. You should do what is comfortable for you. There are, however, a number of practices that are common at Trinity Church: Generally, people stand to sing the hymns, while the Gospel is read and for the post-communion prayer, blessing and dismissal. During the Liturgy of the Eucharist some people will remain standing, while others elect to kneel. Both practices are valid. Many people stand and move around to exchange the Peace with those who are nearby, shaking hands and greeting each other in whatever way is comfortable for them.

FAQ | Frequently Asked Questions

How do I join?

How do I become an

Episcopalian?

The process varies depending upon your situation. If you have already been baptized, the Episcopal Church warmly recognizes that sacrament as valid. You do not have to be re-baptized. If you have already been confirmed, we also recognize that sacrament. If you have already been baptized and confirmed you may be "received" into this branch of Christ's Church by the Bishop of New Hampshire. If you have not been baptized or confirmed, the Vicar will make arrangements for these two events. When the Bishop visits, you will be confirmed. From that moment on, you are an Episcopalian.

How do I become a member

of Trinity Church?

You have already made the first step by joining us for Sunday worship! You are already a member of our community. However, your connection can be deepened through regular participation in worship and involvement in congregation ministries. Depending upon your situation, you may wish to be fully connected through Baptism, Confirmation & Eucharist or Full Reception into the Episcopal Church at some point down the line. For now, just know you are welcome!

I have been divorced and

have remarried. May I

receive Communion?

Yes. The Episcopal Church recognizes that some marriages die. The Church mourns with you, but welcomes you to receive Communion as part of your healing and growth.

What is the difference

between the Episcopal

and Roman Catholic

Churches? The services

seem very similar.

They are similar. Some parts, in fact, are identical. We, however, are part of the worldwide Anglican Communion, formed in England in the 16th century. We have some doctrinal differences with the Church of Rome. We recognize the Pope as the Bishop of Rome, but we do not place ourselves under his authority.

Then is the Episcopal

Church Protestant or

Catholic?

It is both catholic and protestant. Since we are not in communion with the Church of Rome, it considers us protestant. Our doctrines and our practices are mostly what they were before the Protestant Reformation, so we are also catholic. Think of the Episcopal Church as a "bridge church"; standing between these two great traditions – what we truly believe is the best of both.
Trinity Episcopal Church
The Episcopal Church in Hampton, New Hampshire Copyright 2017 Trinity Episcopal Church, Hampton, New Hampshire  03842     603-926-5688      trinity55ad@gmail.com
New to Us?
Information for Newcomers

What We Are About

At Trinity Church we are a community in faith that: respects each individual’s spiritual journey welcomes guests warmly as people whom God has sent for us to nurture on their spiritual journey will welcome you regardless of how much money you have, how old you are, how you are dressed, where you live, or any other distinctions that do not matter wants you to belong so that you can come to believe, rather than tell you what to believe before you can belong wants to help you fall in love with Jesus Christ so that you will want to join him in the work he is doing in the world encourages you to participate in worshipping God instead of just watching clergy and choir do it trusts you to use worship, prayer, and the scripture to form beliefs and act morally rather than try to tell you what you must believe or how you must behave values our relationships with each other more than having everybody agree on the “right” opinions proclaims the Good News that God loves you, and so do we

All Are Welcome

All people of faith - no matter age or denomination - are welcome to "receive communion." Episcopalians open our Table not because we take the Eucharist lightly, but because we take our baptism so seriously.   Visitors who prefer not to receive Communion are welcome to come forward during the Communion to receive a blessing from the Celebrant. Simply cross your arms over your chest as a sign you with to receive such a blessing.

Safe Church 

Trinity Church is a certified Safe Church. All our parish leaders, staff and regular volunteers are trained in best practices that insure the safety and security of everyone who comes to our services and events. Trinity Church provides a safe and healthy environment for all people. The Safe Church program is administered by the Diocese of New Hampshire and overseen at Trinity Church by a volunteer Safe Church Coordinator. You may view our diocese’s Safe Church policy here.
Trinity Episcopal Church

What does the name

“Episcopal Church”

mean?

"The Episcopal Church" is one branch of the world-wide Anglican Communion numbering 70 million members in over 100 countries. It is often described as the "bridge church" because it includes both Catholic and Protestant traditions. It preserves the ancient Catholic faith and sacraments and the historic ministry with Bishops as its chief pastors. ("Episcopal" comes from the Greek word for "bishop.") It is at the same time Protestant, focusing on the basic authority of Holy Scripture and the proclamation of the Word of God.

What are the basic

beliefs of the Episcopal

Church? 

Episcopalians promise to follow Jesus Christ as their Savior and Lord. Episcopalians believe in One God, the Father who creates us and all things, the Son who redeems us from sin and death, the Holy Spirit who renews us as the Children of God. Episcopalians believe the Holy Scriptures to be the Word of God and to contain all things necessary for salvation. We believe God inspired human authors and continues to speak to us through the Bible. Episcopalians affirm that salvation is the end of our separation from God and the beginning of a new relationship with God and with one another. The Apostles' and Nicene Creeds are basic statements of our beliefs in God.

What is the mission of an

Episcopalian?

The mission of an Episcopalian is not simply a matter of "saving souls." Neither is it simply a matter "feeding the hungry." Christian mission is seen as involving both the spiritual and they physical welfare of mankind, for Christ's love must extend to all of life. The mission of the Church is to restore all people to unity with God and each other in Christ.

I don't know when to sit,

stand or kneel.

At Trinity Church, we respect a variety of worship practices and customs. During the service some people may make the sign of the cross or bow at various points, while others do not. You should do what is comfortable for you. There are, however, a number of practices that are common at Trinity Church: Generally, people stand to sing the hymns, while the Gospel is read and for the post-communion prayer, blessing and dismissal. During the Liturgy of the Eucharist some people will remain standing, while others elect to kneel. Both practices are valid. Many people stand and move around to exchange the Peace with those who are nearby, shaking hands and greeting each other in whatever way is comfortable for them.

I have been divorced and

have remarried. May I

receive Communion?

Yes. The Episcopal Church recognizes that some marriages die. The Church mourns with you, but welcomes you to receive Communion as part of your healing and growth.

What is the difference

between the Episcopal

and Roman Catholic

Churches? The services

seem very similar.

They are similar. Some parts, in fact, are identical. We, however, are part of the worldwide Anglican Communion, formed in England in the 16th century. We have some doctrinal differences with the Church of Rome. We recognize the Pope as the Bishop of Rome, but we do not place ourselves under his authority.

Then is the Episcopal

Church Protestant or

Catholic?

It is both catholic and protestant. Since we are not in communion with the Church of Rome, it considers us protestant. Our doctrines and our practices are mostly what they were before the Protestant Reformation, so we are also catholic. Think of the Episcopal Church as a "bridge church"; standing between these two great traditions – what we truly believe is the best of both.

FAQ | Frequently Asked Questions

How do I join?

How do I become an Episcopalian?

The process varies depending upon your situation. If you have already been baptized, the Episcopal Church warmly recognizes that sacrament as valid. You do not have to be re-baptized. If you have already been confirmed, we also recognize that sacrament. If you have already been baptized and confirmed you may be "received" into this branch of Christ's Church by the Bishop of New Hampshire. If you have not been baptized or confirmed, the Vicar will make arrangements for these two events. When the Bishop visits, you will be confirmed. From that moment on, you are an Episcopalian.

How do I become a member of Trinity Church?

You have already made the first step by joining us for Sunday worship! You are already a member of our community. However, your connection can be deepened through regular participation in worship and involvement in congregation ministries. Depending upon your situation, you may wish to be fully connected through Baptism, Confirmation & Eucharist or Full Reception into the Episcopal Church at some point down the line. For now, just know you are welcome!